United Nations (EFE).- US President Joe Biden on Wednesday accused his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, of wanting to end Ukraine’s “right to exist” and issued a strong warning about the use of weapons nuclear weapons by declaring that “a nuclear war cannot be won and should never be fought”.

As soon as he began his address to the UN General Assembly, Biden mentioned the Russian president by name and said, “Putin says he had to act because Russia was under threat. Nobody threatened Russia. No one but Russia was the one seeking conflict.

He assured that the war was the “choice” of one man, Putin, and accused him of wanting to “wipe” Ukraine off the map, in “flagrant” violation of the United Nations Charter, the document founder of the organization and axis of the world liberal order created after the Second World War.

“This war is about ending Ukraine’s right to exist, quite simply,” Biden said.

US President Joe Biden speaks before the United Nations General Assembly on September 21, 2022 in New York.  EFE/Jason Szenes
US President Joe Biden speaks before the United Nations General Assembly on September 21, 2022 in New York. EFE/Jason Szenes

The American president condemned the actions carried out in recent hours by Putin, who ordered the partial mobilization of 300,000 Russian reservists for the war in Ukraine.

Additionally, Biden accused Putin of making “irresponsible threats regarding the use of nuclear weapons,” after the Russian leader vowed to protect his country “by all means” and said those who seek to “to blackmail” with atomic weapons should know that “the wind rose can turn against them.”

concern about nuclear weapons

After condemning the Russian actions, Biden took the opportunity to warn of other “worrying trends” in the area of ​​nuclear proliferation, not only because of Russia, but also because of the policies of China, North Korea and Iran.

In the case of Iran, Biden has said he is ready to return to the 2015 nuclear deal, abandoned by the United States under the Donald Trump administration, as long as Tehran respects its obligations.

“The United States is clear: we will never allow Iran to acquire a nuclear weapon. I continue to believe that diplomacy is the best way to achieve this result,” he said.

More broadly, Biden called on the world to recommit to strengthening the nuclear nonproliferation regime and assured that whatever happens in the rest of the world, the United States is willing to pursue such control measures. of armament.

Refusal of a “cold war” with China

As for China, Biden was candid in saying he was not seeking a “cold war” and reiterated that his country would not support any unilateral change to the status quo with Taiwan, over which Beijing claims sovereignty.

“We are not looking for conflict, we are not looking for a cold war. We do not want any nation to have to choose between the United States and another ally. But the United States will promote a free, open Indo-Pacific and safe and a prosperous world,” Biden told the United Nations General Assembly.

US President Joe Biden speaks before the United Nations General Assembly on September 21, 2022 in New York.  EFE/Jason Szenes
US President Joe Biden speaks before the United Nations General Assembly on September 21, 2022 in New York. EFE/Jason Szenes

The president reiterated his government’s respect for the “one China” principle that Beijing imposes as the basis of its ties with any country, so the only Chinese executive the United States must recognize is the one based in Beijing, which distances it from the independence of Taiwan. aspirations.

These comments on China and Taiwan come after in an interview with the CBS network, broadcast this Sunday, Biden said that he would send American military forces to defend Taiwan in the event that China invades the island.

Food crisis, on Biden’s agenda

Biden also mentioned during his speech the food crisis, aggravated by the crisis in Ukraine and which threatens poor or developing countries with famine.

In this regard, the President announced 2.9 billion dollars in aid, an amount that is added to the 6.9 billion dollars that his government has already allocated this year to food security projects around the world.

Web editor: Juan David Mosos

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