These dates are subject to change and will be updated throughout the year as more certain dates appear. Don’t schedule your itinerary based on the dates you see here. The launch date was compiled by NASA, ESA, Roscosmos, Spaceflight Now, etc.

View NASA webcasts and other launch reports in real time on our “Watch Live” page, and view our night sky webcasts here. Learn about what’s happening in the night sky this month through our visible planets guide and Sky Watch Forecast.

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AUGUST

August 15: The Arianespace Vega rocket, numbered VV19, will launch the Pléiades Neo 4 Earth observation satellite for Airbus. The mission will launch from the Guyana spaceport near Kuru, French Guiana at 9:50 pm. US Eastern Time (0150 Aug 2019) Greenwich Mean Time on the 16th). See live August 19: Jupiter hedges. This gas giant planet will face the sun in Earth’s sky at around the same time it is closest to Earth this year. This planet will shine at its brightest and highest speed tonight and will be visible all night.

August 19: Arianespace will use Soyuz rockets to send 34 satellites into orbit of the Internet constellation OneWeb. The mission is called OneWeb 9 and will launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 6:33 pm. US Eastern Time (2233 Greenwich Mean Time). See live broadcast
August 20: The conjunction of the Moon and Saturn. In the evening sky, the waxy gibbous moon will swing about 3 degrees south of Saturn.

August 22: The August full moon, also known as the sturgeon full moon, occurs at 8:02 a.m. Eastern Time (1202 GMT). This will also be called the “blue moon” because it is the third full moon in a season with four full moons. August
22: The conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. In the night sky, the blue sturgeon moon will rotate about 4 degrees south of Jupiter.

August 24: NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei and JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide will take a planned 6.5-hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station today (August 24) to install the next IROSA on the Port 4 truss Support for solar array. The spacewalk is scheduled to start at 8 o’clock in the morning. US Eastern Time (1200 GMT); NASA’s TV coverage starts at 6:30 in the morning. US Eastern Time (1030 Greenwich Mean Time).

Live broadcast August 27: Aerospace startup Astra will launch a test payload for the US Space Force Space Test Program (STP27AD1). Astra’s 3.3 rocket will lift off from the company’s Kodiak spaceport in Alaska at 4 pm. US Eastern Time (Greenwich Mean Time 2000). The launch window will last until September. 11.

August 28: The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch the Dragon Cargo Refueling Mission (CRS23) to the International Space Station. It will launch from Launch Site 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:37 a.m. Eastern Time (0737 GMT). Watch Live
is also scheduled to launch in August (from Spaceflight Now) – the
SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch another batch of Starlink Internet satellites from the Vandenberg Space Force base in California.

The Rocket Lab will use electronic rockets to launch the eighth and ninth Earth observation satellites for the constellation planned by the Seattle-based company BlackSky Global. The mission, dubbed “Love at First Sight”, will take off from New Zealand’s Macia Peninsula. This will be the first of three BlackSky releases that Rocket Lab plans to release in quick succession between August and September.

September 3: Mercury reaches its highest point in the evening sky. This 0.1 magnitude planet is nearly invisible on the western horizon at sunset.
September 6: The new moon arrives at 8:52 pm. US Eastern Time (September 7, 0052 Greenwich Mean Time). September
9: The conjunction of the moon and Venus. The first quarter of the moon will pass approximately 4 degrees north of Venus. Look for the pair on the western horizon after sunset.

September 13: Mercury extends further east. The innermost planet will reach its maximum distance east of the sun, emitting a bright light with a brightness of 0.1 degrees. Shortly after sunset, capture this elusive planet on the western horizon.
September 14: Neptune objects. This gas giant planet will appear in the largest and brightest time of this year, with a brightness of 7.8 and so on. (You need a telescope to see it).

September 15 – SpaceX will use the Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spacecraft to launch its first mission in civil orbit, called Inspiration 4. It will be launched from launch site 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Watch live September 16: The Joint Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the NASA/USGS Landsat 9 satellite from the Vandenberg Space Force base in California.
September 16: The conjunction of the moon and Saturn. In the evening sky, the waxy gibbous moon will swing about 3 degrees south of Saturn.

September 18: The conjunction of the moon and Jupiter. In the evening sky, the waxy gibbous moon will swing about 4 degrees south of Jupiter. September 20: The full moon in September, called the harvest full moon, occurs at 7:55 in the evening. US Eastern Time (2355 Greenwich Mean Time).

September 22: The vernal equinox arrives at 3:21 pm. EDT (1921 Greenwich Mean Time), which marks the first day of autumn in the northern hemisphere and spring in the southern hemisphere.
September 24: The remnant gibbous moon and Uranus will approach, 1.3 degrees apart from each other. Uranus has a brightness of 5.7 magnitude and can be seen with the naked eye under a dark sky.

is also scheduled to launch in September (from Spaceflight Now): The
Joint Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will launch the STP3 carpool mission for the US Space Force, which will be launched from the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida .
China launch

By Peter

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