There is no consensus on how supermassive black holes are formed, but a fascinating new simulation is solving this problem in an unprecedented way.

Scientists hope that new simulations, such as those recently created by researchers at Northwestern University, can reveal the origin of these huge objects. Among these celestial bodies, some are particularly interesting to scientists, such as the supermassive black hole in the center of our Milky Way, the Milky Way, and the one in the first iconic black hole photograph taken and published by the Event Horizon Telescope. . On 2019.

“The reason supermassive black holes are so difficult to explain is that they require a lot of material to be packed into a small space,” the first author of the new paper and physicist Claude André Faucher Giguère said in a statement . From Northwestern University. “How does the universe do this? So far, theorists have put forward explanations based on different ideas of how the matter in galaxies gathers within one millionth of the size of the galaxy. ”

related: According to astronomers, supermassive black holes may be surprisingly subtle devourers of
. This still image from a new Northwestern University simulation shows the center of a massive galaxy with a supermassive black hole in it.

This still image from Northwestern University’s new simulation shows the center of a massive galaxy with a supermassive black hole. Credit: Andamientos Alcázar et al. 2021, ApJ, 917, 53.)
The mass of the supermassive black hole may be the sun Millions or billions of times, they rely on a constant flow of gas to stay awake. For evolution, scientists need to understand the different ways gas flows in the universe to power it. s.

The new simulation model is a key physical process that affects airflow. The expansion of the universe, the dramatic gravity of gravity, the stellar wind of massive stars, the explosion of supernovae, and the large-scale galactic environment are some of the elements included in the new work to create accurate images.

NGC 1566 is about 40 million light-years away from the Earth, with an active supermassive black hole at its center.
NGC 1566 is about 40 million light-years away from the Earth, with an active supermassive black hole at its center.
(Image source: ESA/Hubble & NASA, thanks: Flickr user Det58) The work of researchers has produced some new ideas about how carbonated food can enter those oversized mouths.

“Our simulations show that structures in galaxies, such as spiral arms, use gravity to ‘slow down’ the gas, otherwise the gas will always orbit the center of the galaxy, said Faucher Giguère.” This braking mechanism allows the gas to fall into the cell.
An article published in the Astrophysical Journal on August 17 details the simulation research.

https://nationalmalldesign.org

By Peter

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